IAEM conference summed up by Twitter

I’ve reviewed the tweets during the IAEM Conference in an effort to pull out the ones that best flavor the conversations occuring in the sessions.  This is a step beyond the capture that is documented here.  Instead of a normal summary of the conference that I’d provide to share learning with others, this time I’m letting Twitter do the talking.  Here’s my list of tweets.  Let me know if you think I missed some.

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EMSE 6310.10 – Information Technology in Crisis and Emergency Management

Here is my “work in progress” of a syllabus for the upcoming course that I’m teaching at the George Washington University.  There’s still some revisions that I plan on doing.  If you were taking this course, what would you want to hear about?

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My thoughts on Craig Fugate’s IAEM Keynote

It is always a pleasure to hear Craig Fugate, the FEMA Administrator, talk at conferences.  He has a no nonsense approach that is a breath of fresh air.  Fugate is not afraid to speak his mind and talk openly.  This write up is based on his keynote address at the International Association of Emergency Managers conference in November 2010.  You can view the blow by blow reporting by searching for #IAEM on Twitter.

At the IAEM conference, Craig Fugate made a point that has really stuck with me.  I would tag it as a perspective changer.  It isn’t a radical change that requires a huge effort to agree with, it only requires a person to look at something from another point of view.  Granted it can be easier to move mountains then change some people’s perspectives, and then implementation is a whole other step.

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Kill career in one simple step: promote them

A toy figure laid flat in from of a crowd of figutedThe best way to kill the career of technology person is to promote them. Seriously, it is that simple. I have both witnessed and experienced what happens when you take a person who is really good at their work, and promote them to manage other people doing that work. Performing a technical task is much different skill set than managing people. Developing technical people to change their career field from technical to management is a transition that takes time and investment to be successful.

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